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Sandymount Park - The other (Newgrove Ave) building



Eithne O'Mara at Sandymount Park (the Newgrove Ave building) in 1930.
This would be the S side.
The layout (no window in bottom left) somewhat matches later pictures.
See copy in [P106/510(2)].





Origins

There were two buildings at Sandymount Park, Co.Dublin.
The main building (with an entrance on Strand Rd) was designed around 1790 by James Gandon.
It is unclear when the other building (with an entrance on Newgrove Ave) was constructed.
It appears on the 1829 to 1842 map and in [Dublin Almanac, 1838], so is at least that old.
It is possible that this building was by Gandon too. (Indeed this is likely if they were part of the same estate from the start.)
This would mean there is a lost Gandon building on the site.
Eithne O'Mara said she and Dick lived in the "Gandon building", which she identified as this other building, not the main house. So perhaps both were by Gandon.

"Sandymount Park" used to refer to both buildings at this site.
Eventually the main building got re-named.
This building kept the name "Sandymount Park".
It was also called "28 Newgrove Ave".

John Kelly is listed at Sandymount Park (28 Newgrove Ave) in [Census, 1911].
The entry says it has 9 rooms, 5 windows in front of house, has 1 stable and no other out-buildings.
(The census number 28 is confirmed as the real street number 28 by cross-referencing with Thom's Directory.)
G.W. Dench is listed at Sandymount Park, 28 Newgrove Ave, Pembroke, in [Thom's, 1919].


Dick Humphreys

Sandymount Park (28 Newgrove Ave) was acquired by Dick Humphreys and his wife Eithne O'Mara after their marriage, late 1929.
Eithne identified their building as this building, not the Roslyn Park building.
They left Aug 1933.

James Ivan McGuire is listed at Sandymount Park, 28 Newgrove Ave, Pembroke, in [Thom's, 1945].
28 Newgrove Ave is still listed as "Sandymount Park" in [Thom's, 1949].
It is listed as vacant in [Thom's, 1950].


Roslyn Park school and Rehab

The building became part of Roslyn Park school around 1950.
28 Newgrove Ave is listed as Convent of the Sacred Heart of Mary in [Thom's, 1951] onwards.

It became part of Rehab in 1983.
This building today is either demolished or (possibly) hidden under a newer building.




 

1829 to 1842 map shows the other building of Sandymount Park existing at this time.
It may have existed from the start.
Note that the main building is a more impressive house than this building. The main building has a gate lodge, a longer drive, and more outbuildings.
Note that Laburnum Lodge (residence of Segrave) does not refer to our building. It is clearly listed in [Pettigrew & Oulton, 1845] as a different place to both buildings of Sandymount Park.



Eithne, Sandymount Park, 1930.
Would be SE corner.
Unidentified car, ZI 4844.
See copy in [P106/510(3)].



Sandymount Park.
Must be Eoige, 1930-31.



An ad for Sandymount Park (28 Newgrove Ave).
Note 5 windows in front and no basement (matches the census, and is clearly different to Roslyn Park).
View from SE. The side of the building here is clearly the side shown in the photos above (see the right-angled change in height of the roof at the corner).
See larger.
A note attached to this ad says: "1931 ?"



Sandymount Park (as part of Roslyn Park school and convent).
Photo 1979. See larger and full size.
View from SE. It has been heavily modified. Only the high chimneys and the vague layout of the windows remain to reflect the old building.
From here in Patrick Healy Collection.
From South Dublin Libraries, Local Studies Collection See terms of use.

See extract of review in the Irish Times, February 28, 1970, of [Craig, 1969].
Craig says the Gandon house is "lost" inside Roslyn Park school. He seems to imply that the Gandon house was Sandymount Park (by this time buried inside other buildings) rather than Roslyn Park (standing alone).
But maybe he was just looking for "Sandymount Park" and assumed "Roslyn Park" was not relevant.



Sandymount Park (as part of Roslyn Park school and convent).
Photo 1981. See larger and full size.
From here in Patrick Healy Collection.
From South Dublin Libraries, Local Studies Collection See terms of use.



Sandymount Park.
Photo 1982. See larger and full size.
From here in Patrick Healy Collection.
From South Dublin Libraries, Local Studies Collection See terms of use.



Sandymount Park (or site of) today.
It is hidden in a complex of buildings on the grounds. (See Roslyn Park behind it.)
The old Sandymount Park building has either been completely demolished or (possibly) remains hidden under a newer building.
Screenshot from 2009 street view.
See current street view.




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