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My wife's ancestors - Maltass - Contents


John Maltass


John Maltass.
He must be John Maltass who mar 3 July 1805, Smyrna, to Louise Belleville [LDS IGI].
He built what is now called The Steinbuchel House in Bornova, near Smyrna [Kalcas, 1983].

A document on Maltass references a "Commission to Administer Oath" to the British Consul at Smyrna or Vienna [where son John was], date 16 May 1843, ref. "BRS. DA. 1932", with reference to a suit of "Louisa Ann Frances", widow of John Maltass of Smyrna, versus John Maltass, their son and an executor of his father's will.

John died pre-1844.
He "left a large fortune" [1844 letter].
He had issue:


  1. John Maltass,
    must be John Maltass, son of John Maltass and "Louisa", who was born 11th Apr 1806, and bapt 18th Apr [British Chaplaincy, Smyrna],
    married, living as at 1844 in Vienna.

  2. Helen Maltass,
    she must be "Helen Margaret Maltass", dau of John Maltass and "Frances Ann Louisa", who was born 8th Aug 1807, bapt 2nd Sept [British Chaplaincy, Smyrna],
    mar --- Abbott [or Abbot, merchant] and had issue [ancestors of Abbott of Smyrna].


  3. Eugenie Maltass,
    or Eugenia, born est c.1820,
    inherited what is now called The Steinbuchel House in Bornova,
    mar Dr. Charles Wood and had issue.


  4. Clementina Maltass,
    unmarried as at 1844.


John is possibly also the father of:

  1. William Augustus Maltass,
    born 1808, son of "John Maltass, Merchant",
    died 1830, age 22 yrs,
    bur 18 July 1830 [British Chaplaincy, Smyrna].





The Steinbuchel House, Bornova

The Steinbuchel House is one of the European houses in Bornova.
Also called the Matthey's House, and later the Wood-Paterson House. Now called the Steinbuchel House.

The house has a fine gateway. "For the passerby along what was recently called Hürriyet Caddesi, the lovely lines of the Steinbüchel entrance gateway are an instant attraction, especially in spring when its arch is festooned by the lilac tresses of wistaria blossom." [Kalcas, 1983].
The gateway is flanked by two exterior seats. "It was the custom of residents to sit on these in the cool of the evening and exchange news with passing friends, a custom probably developed because of the high walls surrounding each property preventing any casual contact." [Kalcas, 1983, p.40].




Gate to the Steinbüchel House.
See full size. From here.



Location of the Steinbüchel House.
The Rektörlügü is "The Big House".
Think the Rektörlügü is actually the red-roofed building N of the arrow.
The gate to the Steinbüchel House is at the roundabout to the NW of the Rektörlügü.
The house to the NE of the roundabout is the Steinbüchel House.
From Google Maps.
The "roundabout" here was in fact the old main square of Bornova, where five roads met. See satellite view.



View of the road junction in 1890s.
On left is the Steinbüchel House.
On right is entrance to "The Big House".
From Levantine Heritage. Used with permission.



Gate to the Steinbüchel House, c.1900.
From Levantine Heritage. Used with permission.
See another scan from here.



View of the road junction in 1920s.
From Levantine Heritage. Used with permission.



Gate to the Steinbüchel House.
From here.



Gate to the Steinbüchel House.
From Levantine Heritage. Used with permission.



Gate to the Steinbüchel House.
See full size. From here.



Gate to the Steinbüchel House.
View from further away to the left.
From here.



The Steinbüchel House.
From here at wowturkey.com.



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